Good space.

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This week, I stayed in a tipi with a dear friend and our passel of girls. We had such a good time on vacation. We ate good food, we talked, we laughed a lot, and we were all outside from morning until sundown. The kids got into the freezing cold water at the pool every day, because to them, vacations must involve swimming no matter how cold the water.

Time away gave me the opportunity to experience several days of not being busy. I go through phases when I fantasize about moving outside of the city and living closer to nature, with animals and dirt and sky, and though my fantasy is pretty sweet (and probably nothing like what would actually be involved in that kind of livin) I think what I really crave is more open, relaxed time. And more time outside.

I’m not a perpetually over-scheduled person.  Not because I’m particularly wise or evolved but because if I attempt it, I get sick. Five days without enough rest and I get a sucky cold.  So I know I do best when there’s some leisure in my day.  Though some seasons are busier than others, I manage to keep my schedule manageable. Even so, my daily life doesn’t have the feel of our days in a tipi. I rarely take time to sit and visit over tea at breakfast time. Most of my day is spent indoors. And yet, the leisure is where some of the sweetest conversations arise with my girls, especially Hazel. The leisure is when ideas come. When I have good space between activities, sometimes I have these visions of something I could write about or something I’d like to paint. I can be more spontaneous when I’m not busy because there isn’t somewhere I have to be in 15 minutes. One of the most lovely things? When there’s time and space, I can feel my body calm. That calm is a place I’d like to be most of the time. Steady and calm. Sthira and sukha.

I’m considering that it may be possible to do less. It may be possible to go outside first thing in the morning and see what’s happening with the weather and the sky and the moisture in the air. If I attempt to be sukha, instead of ‘really efficient’, I suspect my day will feel different. If I’m noticing the times when I’ve lost touch with the good space, with the sukha, the good space, maybe I’ll be able to see how to bring it in again and again.

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Looking for ways to cultivate good space in your life? Join me this weekend in Onion Creek, TX for a 2 hour workshop about the Niyamas, and find out how the personal observances of cleanliness, contentment, effort, the study of sacred scriptures and of one’s self, and the ability to surrender can improve our relationship with ourselves with others and can  help us find good space.

Onion Creek Country Club

March 21st, 2015 10:15-12:15

1hr of conversation and 1hr of practice

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4 thoughts on “Good space.

  1. What a lovely post! And it’s also interesting how “being busy” can have totally different meanings. My 3 year old son says: “Mama, I am busy” when he carefully stacks his blocks on top of each other. There is no rush, no sense of urgency in his “busy”, he is just focused and totally present with his task. My “being busy” usually means that I am in a hurry and acutely aware of time. I much prefer his “busy” 🙂

    1. I like his “busy” too! This makes me think of the Montessori language of learning. All the learning that the kids do is “work.” I like to think ALL of the stuff I’m doing here on the planet is also part of my work, not just the kind I get paid for.

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